BALL – A Traumedy


BALL – A Traumedy
ONE MAN… ONE BALL… ONE HOUR

The Chapman Society has been proud to present performances of “BALL – A Traumedy”, by Brian Lobel, in 2006 and 2007.

More about the 2006 performance:  “Cancer survivor puts on ‘traumedy’ play tonight” by Amy Reinink, The Gainesville Sun, March 2, 2006

Brian Lobel has one ball – and this is his story.

BALL is a solo performance about illness, struggle and survivorship. In this 70 minute piece, Brian attempts to answer the following question: in a world of Lance Armstrong-style successes and victories, what’s an awkward, unathletic, average testicular cancer patient to do? This is not your mother’s illness drama. BALL sees all of the disgusting parts of cancer not as things which should be changed into things beautiful or inspirational. Instead, the sperm bank, the catheters, and the hair loss take center stage in all their glory, in a manner which is honest, irreverent and, ultimately, healing. BALL was the first solo performance to be awarded the Hopwood Drama Award at the University of Michigan, a creative writing award made famous by its most well-known former winner, Arthur Miller. Check it out on the web at: http://brianlobel.freeservers.com/BALL1.htm

Students & faculty enjoyed lunch on the lawn with Brian after his 2006 performance.

There’s No Time Like The Present To Learn How…

Check your testicles once a month.

In the shower:  Roll each testicle between your thumb and finger. Feel for hard lumps or bumps on the front or side of the testicle.  If you notice a change or lumps, contact your doctor right away.

Cancer of the testicle can be cured if you find it early.

Breast cancer may be cured if you find it early.  The best early diagnostic cancer check is a mammogram.
When your doctor checks your breasts, ask about this.

Use the shower check.  Check your breasts about one week after your period.  Press firmly with the pads of your fingers.  Move your left hand over your right breast in a circular motion.  Now check your left breast with your right hand in the same way.  If there are any lumps, knots, or changes, tell your doctor right away.